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engage & influence

Learn How To Own Your Vocal Stage Even In A Virtual Setting : Register Here

engage & influence

Image courtesy of Rawpixal

Have you always wanted vocal presence and the ability to really engage and influence your audience?

Well, where ever you are in the world and from the comfort of you own home you can learn how now!

Join a small online community of 6 to 8 people in a series of intensive sessions designed to instantly improve your face to face and virtual communications. 

Consciously using your voice & body as effective communication tools will help you to achieve vocal presence. It is a skill and like all skills it can be taught, learned and practised to become so much better!

By simply controlling your voice and physical presence deliberately you can have greater influence over your audience and engage them more effectively

If you could achieve vocal presence and engage and influence people more effectively, what would that mean for you personally? What would it mean for your career?

The course is divided into 3 short intensive virtual group sessions followed by 2 individual and bespoke 121’s 

Group Session Dates

June 26 – 10.00 – 11.30 

June 29 – 10.00 – 11.30

July  1   – 10.00 – 11.30

You will learn how to be an engaging, authentic and influential speaker and what you need to change in your own style in order to achieve this.

Learn stage performance techniques, used by the world’s most respected performers (honed for the business executive). We can help transform your credibility and confidence.

Register here

engaged audience

3 Top Tips For Sensational Presenting

engaged audience

 

I’m a voice coach so normally I would talk about physical and vocal skills when it comes to sensational presenting.  How you look and how you sound are always at the top of my list of important skills.

But today I’d like to give you a few tips I was given recently that spoke to me on another level.

The 3 tips I’m giving you here are not so much about the mechanics of delivering your words as they are about being human.

Sensational presenting really starts to sing when you remember that a presentation is so much more than just words and information.

 

Sensational Presenting: The Head, The Heart, and The Hand

 

A veteran presenter once told me before a speech, ‘Lead them by the head, the heart, and the hand.’.

Think of your presentation as being more than just words and information.  It will help any stiff formality or obstacles between you and the audience fall away.

How can you connect with your audience as a human being in a room full of human beings?

People want to be touched emotionally.  When you reach out to your audience on an emotional level, they will trust more readily.  And trust is what you want from your audience.

 

The Head

First, you have to assure the audience that you’re worth listening to.  After all, they’ve taken time out to be there and want to know their time is being well spent.

You need to establish your credibility with the audience.  Sensational presenting shows the audience you know your subject.  That you are an expert in your field.  What’s your pedigree, track record for success?

 

The Heart

Second, you need to let them know you’re on their side.  Sensational presenting involves your audience liking you or at least knowing that you know their pain.

Let your audience know that you are aware of their challenges and that you have answers to help them with those challenges.

The audience is always asking themselves one question as they sit there spending their precious time with you:  Why should I care about this?

Sensational presenting answers this burning question for the audience.  Your audience will care if you show that you care.  Perhaps share a story from your own journey that illustrates how you overcame obstacles or challenges of your own.

When they hear you’ve overcome difficulties yourself, they know you empathize with them.

 

The Hand

Lastly, the hand metaphor refers to what they take away from your presentation.  Sensational presenting leads the audience towards some kind of practical, concrete steps or knowledge they can take home and put into practice.

The audience comes in with questions and wants to leave with answers.  Put into their hands something they can use, a tool that will help them with their challenges.

This reminds me of Chris Anderson’s definition of persuasion as ‘the act of replacing someone’s world view with something better’.  The audience wants to leave feeling different than when they came in.

 

 

The 30, 20, 10 Rule in Sensational Presenting

This is a tried and tested rule that all sensational presenting incorporates to some degree.  It’s a great example of ‘a little knowledge goes a long way’.

Simply stated, 30 is the minimum font size to use on slides, 20 is the maximum length of a presentation in minutes, and 10 is the maximum number of slides to use.

The 30, 20, 10 rule will help you avoid Death By Powerpoint and avoid losing your audience.  Here’s how it works.

 

Font Size Matters For Sensational Presenting – 30 points

Here’s a good rule of thumb when it comes to your slides:  30 point font is the minimum size to be visible from the audience.

One of the easiest mistakes to make on your slides is trying to cram in as much information as possible by using smaller font.  Sensational presenting takes into account the tried and tested rule ‘More Is Not Necessarily Better’.

If you try to squash in loads of words on the screen, your audience will end up not reading any of it.  And worse, they’ll be so distracted by the fact that they can’t read what they’re supposed to be able to read that they’ll stop listening to you.

Your audience would much rather listen to you speak than be reading off the screen in a read-along with you.

 

Keep Them Wanting More – 20 minutes

20 minutes is enough time to say what you need to say about pretty much anything.  Every audience will thank you for keeping it short.  Sensational presenting means having the ability to cut and crop your content for the sake of your audience.

If you have 20 minutes allocated to you for a presentation, plan a 10 minutes presentation.  You will probably speak for twice your rehearsed time when the adrenaline starts kicking in so leave yourself some wiggle room.

Sensational presenting always follows this rule of thumb:  Brevity Is Beauty.

 

Less Is More In Amazing Presentations – 10 slides

Ultimately, your slides are there only to help you tell your story better.  They are not there to be a crutch for you if you’re not prepared or don’t know your content.  10 slides or less is adequate to support any story.

Slides are never the story in sensational presenting.  You are the story.  The slides are only there to serve you and the story.  If your tech goes down you still have to give the presentation, without your slides, so be prepared.

You actually don’t needs slides for the majority of sensational presenting.  Only use them to add colour and texture to your story.  Slides are only there to help the audience to see what you see.

 

 

Knowledge Can Be A Dangerous Thing

Sensational presenting involves weeding out what the audience doesn’t need to know and what they do.  There’s a great book called ‘Made To Stick’ by Chip and Dan Heath which warns that a lot of knowledge can become a bad thing if left unchecked.

When you’re an expert in your field it can be easy to speak in acronyms, use phrases the audience doesn’t know, or use ‘in jokes’ that leaves 90% of the audience completely lost.

Make your presentation easy for the audience to understand and follow and use simple language.  It’s not a matter of dumbing down; it’s a matter of simplicity.

 

Sensational Presenting And Generosity

Essentially, you want to keep your audience with you, not running to catch up with you or left behind.  So keep it simple, remember less is more, and keep your audience in the spotlight.  Think of what you can do to make their life easier today and you have a much better chance of delivering a sensational presentation.

confident speaker

Boost Your Business: Become A Confident Speaker

confident speaker

A Confident Speaker Prepares

Everyone in business uses verbal communication on a regular basis for meetings, negotiations, and presentations.

Yet not every business person is a confident speaker.

Knowledge is power and there are a few tips and tricks you can use to feel more confident, credible, and engaged in your business communications.

 

Craft A Clear Story

If you want to feel and look like a confident speaker, you’ve got to prepare and do your homework.

This means crafting a clear story that will engage people.

We are hard-wired to love hearing and telling stories so make sure your story is something your audience can relate to.

People who are perceived as being confident speakers are the best storytellers because they gain the trust of their audience.

This doesn’t mean you’re perfect.

It means that you are connected with your story in an emotional way.

And if you are emotionally connected to your story – there’s a better chance that your audience will be too.

 

Know your audience

You must know who you’re talking to before you craft your story.  Take into account who your audience is and what their challenges might be.

If you don’t, you may as well be writing a love letter to ‘To Whom It May Concern’.

You will come across as a more confident speaker if you do your homework and know as much about your audience as possible.

If you’re a key note speaker, your basic story content may stay the same each time you deliver it.

But customize it for each audience by beginning it with something specific to that group of people.  It will help you come across as a more empathetic, prepared, and confident speaker.

 

Breathe!

Breathing Is Key

Breath is the cornerstone for all great communication.

A confident speaker knows that not all breath is created equal.  Shallow breathing is far less useful to you than a deep, centered breath.

When you center your breath in your lower belly you also bring your focus and attention there.  This is a place of power, strength, and balance.

When you breathe from the lower belly, you are more inclined to connect with calm, grounded feelings.

When you breathe into the upper chest and shoulder area, you are more likely to feel anxiety or panic.

How you breathe effects your physiology.

 

Breath Is Fuel For A Confident Speaker

Your body breathes without your help to keep all your necessary functions ticking over.

But you can choose what kind of breath will fuel your communications.  Speaking with a strong, supported voice will help you look and feel like a confident speaker.

The quality of the breath and fuel you give your thoughts, voice, and choices will depend on where and how you breathe.

 

 

 

Rehearse That Story!

Practice Out Loud

Performers have a saying:  ‘Rehearse, rehearse, rehearse.  And then rehearse some more.’  The words you write on the page are always going to be slightly different to the words you end up speaking out loud.  It’s the nature of transferring written word to spoken word.

Once you’ve mapped out your story, stand it up and start speaking it out loud.  Every confident speaker knows that speaking your words aloud help you get the feel of the structure of your story and memorize the words.  As Bob Dylan says, “I’ll know my song well before I start singing.”.

Film Yourself

In order to become a more confident speaker, you have to get feedback on how you look and how you sound.

Your phone, tablet, or laptop are readily available sources of non-judgmental feedback.  Film yourself for 2-3 minutes, watch it back, tweak, and go again.

A good tip is to be specific about what it is you’re practicing each time you film yourself.

Am I focusing on my vocal delivery?  My physical presence?  Am I looking at the rhythm of my language?  The structure of the story?

The more specific you are, the more value you’ll get out of your practice time.

 

Take It Live

Find one or two people you trust and get in front of them.  To become a more confident speaker, treat this practice run as you would the real thing.

Begin your story as you would in front of the real audience and invest the same amount of passion and urgency into your performance as you would for a live audience.

Make the stakes high.  The more real you make the trial run, the better prepared you’ll be for the real thing.

Becoming a more confident speaker means preparing yourself as much as possible for real-time stress.

 

Hard Work + Action = A Confident Speaker

Becoming a more confident speaker is a process.  Confidence is a combination of hard work, repetition, and having a clear plan of action.

As with any other endeavour, change happens step by step, a little at a time.

The trick is to create good habits and consistently make new choices that support your story, your voice, and your physical presence.

Becoming a confidence speaker starts with awareness about how you look and sound, whether or not this is serving your communications, and then making changes. 

Know your story, breathe, and practice, practice, practice.

Your hard work will pay off and who knows… you may even start to enjoy it!  Imagine that.

 

With Great Posture Comes Great Presentation!

“With Great Posture comes Great Presentation”*

 said Voltaire *almost

For a great presentation, great posture and body language are imperative. 

Ideally, we want to portray a more confident, more measured and more approachable presence when speaking or giving a presentation. 

Here is how and why with great posture, comes great presentation.

So here are 4 tips to improve your presentation skills, with Posture and Body Language

1  Posture 

Your posture affects your voice. So before you begin, here are 6 ways to perfect your posture for speaking

*Depending on whether you are standing or sitting

  • Standing – plant your feet parallel, hipbone width apart and think Tall and Open
  • Sitting – sit squarely on your set feet planted slightly apart and hands resting comfortably
  • Spine straight and neither slumped nor rigid
  • Work tension out of the shoulders and the neck area.
  • Swing the arms – this is an important area, because we want them relaxed
  • Smile and open the jaw – soften your jaw

 

2  Use your Head

Face your audience, eyes front.

What we are looking for here is openness, to be on the same level as your audience and to be approachable. 

Often used when listening to somebody,  is the 45 degree angle. (think of your posture when taking questions from your audience)

This unintentionally comes across as superiority with an unapproachable air.

The Mona Lisa is a perfect example of this, does she have an air of engagement, is she ready to listen? Is she open and approachable? Certainly not!

how not to look at your audience!

 

3  Straighten up!  

It’s something most of us will have been told at some point, yet it’s something many of us fail to do when we present.

Here’s where posture comes into play again.

A straight back and a tall posture helps you to project your voice and confidence.

Hunching your shoulders, in contrast, can make you look withdrawn and lacking in confidence.

When we feel low, we often hunch our shoulders.We feel vulnerable and we retreat into ourselves.

We feel small.

On the other hand, when we feel jubilant, we leap in the air with outstretched arms.

We feel tall.

Take this feeling into your presentations.

Stand up tall with a straight back, You’ll look confident, positive and approachable.

Stanford Graduate School of Business provide an interesting talk on how to Make Body Language Your Super Power

 

 

4 Uncross everything!

Why do we sometimes cross our legs when standing up to give a presentation?

 

 

*We feel it’s a more comfortable way of standing.

*We’re nervous.

*We’re completely unaware of the fact we’re crossing our legs.

Perhaps all three.

The problem is that it’s giving a signal to the audience that we feel uncomfortable presenting. Body language and good posture are vital to a good presentation.

Take a close look at the picture above, though smiling, her arms are as close to her body as possible and her legs are crossed.

Does she look confident and open?

The audience wants to feel that it’s in capable hands – and they’re only going to feel that if you uncross your legs and stand up straight, with great posture and body language.

 

When you hold yourself confidently, the audience will feel that confidence – and naturally believe in you.

 

International Women's Day

To Celebrate International Women’s Day – Great Female Public Speakers from TED Share Their Stories

To celebrate International Women’s Day 2020, we thought it would be interesting to share a bunch of great public speakers from TED with you.

These talks are entertaining, educational, inspirational and we love them!

So, put the kettle on, put your feet up,  and have a listen to some really cool women  with something great to share.

 

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie: The Danger Of A Single Story

Our lives, our cultures, are composed of many overlapping stories. Novelist Chimamanda Adichie tells the story of how she found her authentic cultural voice — and she warns that if we hear only a single story about another person or country, we, therefore, risk a critical misunderstanding.

 

Paula Johnson: His And Hers… Healthcare

Every cell in the human body has a sex, which therefore means that men and women are different right down to the cellular level. Yet too often, research and medicine ignore this insight — and the often startlingly different ways in which the two sexes respond to disease or treatment. As pioneering doctor Paula Johnson describes in this thought-provoking talk, lumping everyone in together means we essentially leave women’s health to chance. In conclusion, it’s time to rethink.

 

 

 

Anne-Marie Slaughter: Can We Have It All?

Anne-Marie Slaughter, Public policy expert, made waves with her 2012 article, “Why women still can’t have it all.” But really, is this only a question for women? Here Slaughter expands her ideas and explains why shifts in work culture, public policy and social mores can lead to more equality –Above all,  for men, women and, all of us.

 

 

 

Tan Le: A Headset That Reads Your Brainwaves

Tan Le’s astonishing new computer interface reads its user’s brainwaves, therefore making it possible to control virtual objects, and even physical electronics, with mere thoughts (and a little concentration). In addition, she demos the headset, and talks about its far-reaching applications.

 

 

 

Elizabeth Gilbert: Success, Failure and the Drive to Keep Creating

To say her book, Eat, Pray, Love was a smashing success is an understatement. Even she knew she couldn’t rival that success immediately, but she stayed true to who she is and always “returns home” as she puts it. For Elizabeth it is the art and process of writing that gives her the greatest joy. As long as she stays focused on that she can ride the waves of up and down book sales because regardless of how a book sells, she will write another one.

 

 

Dame Stephanie Shirley: Why Do Ambitious Women Have Flat Heads?

Dame Stephanie Shirley: Why Do Ambitious Women Have Flat Heads?  “Who would have guessed the programming of the black box flight recorders for the supersonic Concorde would have been done by a bunch of women working in their own homes, would pioneer the remote workplace?”  Dame Shirley who escaped the Holocaust by being sent to London to live with strangers at age five is my fourth-best Ted Talk. Then she “got on with it” and became a successful tech entrepreneur in the 1960’s founding one of the most progressive all-women businesses based on work-from-home, job sharing, flex-time and employee ownership.

 

 

 

silence

3 Reasons Why Silence Is A Powerful Weapon

Power of Silence

Photo by Ocean Biggshott on Unsplash

Did you know that one of the least used, but most effective, strategies when it comes to negotiations of any kind … is silence. Why you might ask, well because silence gives you a number of advantages.

 

1. Learn From The Experts

What do the best negotiators generally have in common? They will always make their opponents wait for an answer.

When we are nervous or eager we have a tendency to jump in right after the other person has spoken. And the result? It looks like we’re nervous, insecure, or even worse, that we haven’t been listening.  

2. A Well-Placed Silence Can Build Relationships

If you’re silent and wait, it conveys the impression that you are listening and thinking about what the other person has said. And, of course, it also sends a signal that you are weighing your answer carefully.

3. Silence Buys You Time

Silence buys you the time to prepare a response. The appearance of thinking, also buys you a few seconds to think.

Being chatty in negotiating is not very powerful, and it usually doesn’t achieve the desired result but the art of creative silence takes practice. Sometimes it takes concentration to simply do nothing. 

Try practicing getting used to silence when you’re not under pressure. 

These three reasons are why silence is one of the best negotiating tactics you can learn.

What do you think are great negotiation tactics?

Leave a comment below!

For more useful tips and ideas check out our other blogs here or contact us to see how we can help you to transform your voice and your communications.

Whilst you are here you might enjoy some of these:

 

5 Steps To Get Rid Of That Dreaded “Bed Voice”

 

Bed Voice

Have you ever overslept, and rushed into a meeting or a webinar, or maybe it was a last minute conference call; or phone call from your boss ? Even if you are lucky enough to be one of those people who snap into alert mode as soon you wake up – I wish I was one of those people!! – we’ve all had moments where our voice seems to fail to catch up with our brain. It’s sometimes referred to as our ‘Bed Voice’

You know what I mean, that flat, heavy, sluggish voice we have first thing!

A client I worked with, on one of our 121 programmes, had to speak regularly on early morning radio. I always remember her being very conscious of her “bed voice”, and was keen to know how to shake it off.

So, in a nutshell, here is how you do it;

Step 1 – Quench that thirst!

One of the primary reasons for this “bed voice” is simply down to the fact that you (and your voice) are dehydrated after sleep  – hence muscles work a little slower and a little more sluggishly.  Drink a glass of water, drinking coffee (although it may be more tempting) will do little to help your voice.

 

Step 2 – Good Vibrations

Place your hands on your head – and hum a gentle ‘mmmm’ sound. Put the focus of the hum into the top of your head until you feel vibrations in your head. Repeat a few times.

 

Step 3 – Get humming

Gently hum up and down your pitch range.  So just like the scales on a piano, start on your lowest note and gently and slowly hum/glide your way up to the highest note you can go (without pushing or forcing) Repeat a few times.

 

Step 4 – Luscious Lips

Place your finger tips on your lips (palm faced in) and again gently hum a ‘mmmm’ sound.  Feel vibrations, or a tingly sensation on your lips and the surrounding area. Repeat a few times, and feel your bed voice start to disappear.

 

Step 5 – Massage

Give your entire face a massage  – your cheeks, lips, forehead, nasal area. In other words awaken your face, stretch your mouth and have a good yawn!

Check out this great talk from Julian Treasure on how to warm up your voice

So remember these five tips next time you need to get rid of your bed voice and enjoy the work out!

Olivia

For more useful tips and ideas check out our other blogs here or contact us to see how we can help you to transform your voice and your communications.

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Could The Simple Act Of ‘Stillness’ Be The Key To Achieving Executive Presence?

Stillness & Presence

Through out the years, we have supported many individuals across the corporate and private sector from all over Europe. We’ve trained C-Suite Personnel,  Business Executives, Sales Professionals, Scientist, Engineers, Legal and Medical Professionals, and one topic that comes up over and over again is ‘Executive Presence’ and how to achieve it.

Understanding The Power Of Presence

Let me share with you an insight I had some time ago, which might help you to understand and build on your own Presence

I try to go for run most days and one of the routes I have enjoyed most over the years, is the lovely Phoenix Park here in Dublin. One day, along my route, I came face to face with a large herd of deer. They were all standing very still, regarding my presence with quiet curiosity.

What struck  me most at the time, was their immense stillness. The deer possessed such calmness and a phenomenal sense of ease and yet, they were also completely alert, ready to flee at any sign of danger.

I stood looking at them for what seemed like an age, transfixed and drawn by something – their amazing ‘Presence’

Achieving Executive Presence

An audience is always connected to a speaker who communicates in a relaxed and calm way, but just like a wild deer, a speaker always needs be alert to the audience. So if building your executive presence is something on your mind, try this simple technique – stop moving, stay grounded and still!

 

The Art of Stillness Builds Executive Presence

Moving around may help you to calm nerves or to feel at ease but it can be very distracting for your audience. Instead, try to find an ease within yourself to simply stand still and be present. By just following this technique, not only will you build your presence in front of your audience, you will also connect in a stronger and more authentic way

 

Stillness is a simple, yet powerful technique to build presence”

 

 

Remember this; as a speaker, you have the ability to instil any emotion in your audience.

If you are agitated or stressed then your audience will also be agitated and stressed. If you are at ease and physically relaxed and grounded, then your listeners will also be at ease and guess what…they will also be more open to listening, and building that all important connection with you. You will have achieved ‘presence’!

Sometimes we just need to demystify things and go back to basics when it comes to communication! So next time you are rehearsing your presentation, try this technique to achieve Executive Presence.

Cicero’ s 5 Canons Of A Great Speech Still Relevant? Try Them To Help Banish Presentation Nerves

Great speechMark Twain once said ‘There are two kinds of speakers in the world:  Those who get nervous and those who are liars..’ And he wouldn’t be far off.  Everyone gets a dose of presentation nerves, some just hide it better than others!   Even the greatest orator in history Marcus Tullius Cicero once ran from the forum where he was set to speak because he was terrified with nerves.  

 

TED coaches, CEO’s of Fortune 500 companies, even presidents get nervous.  But the trick is to look and sound cool, calm, and collected even when you’re not feeling the love.  

 

Cicero knew that you have to “fake it ‘till you make it”, but it’s actually more than that; it’s fake it until you become it.  Unless you’re soaked in sweat and physically unable to speak, audiences don’t know what you don’t tell them.  

 

The ancient Romans and Greeks invented this kind of thinking; they called the art of oratory actio as in ‘acting’.  A speaker is an actor, and the best actors are the ones who are most truthful, convincing, and authentic on stage.

 

These ancient orators also knew about nerves and that they can be an important part of pumping up your energy before you go on, and, if managed properly, you can channel that energy to give your performance passion, charisma, and memorability.

 

People won’t be able to take their eyes off you and they may not even know why.  Here’s Cicero’s 5 Cannons and how they can help you knock it out of the park even when you’re feeling like you can’t even suit up to bat.

 

The 5 Canons

Cicero, that great orator, came up with five aspects of giving a great speech or ‘Canons’.  There’s no substitute to combat presentation nerves than being well prepared and he was the king of relentless preparation and practice, as he was taught by his Greek tutors.

 

Cicero’s canons are thus:

Invention, Style, Memory, Arrangement, Delivery.

 

1. Invention:  The Hook

This is the nugget of what you want to say.  It’s the distilled essence of what your speech or presentation is all about and why people should listen.  

It’s usually around 40 words or less and about 12 seconds, roughly the length of a human breath, and it is one sentence.  But that’s it!  

Brevity is beauty.  Keep it simple and keep it short and audiences will love you for it.

 

2. Arrangement:  Road Map The Journey Of A Presentation

Before you open PowerPoint, sit down and map out your story. Every speech or presentation is a story that has a beginning, middle, and end, and once you’ve got that clear, it’s time to open PowerPoint and see what you need to support and illustrate your message that will add colour, texture, and memorability.  

Story first, PowerPoint after. This will ensure you are clear in your journey and will help you avoid using PowerPoint as a report or crutch.

 

3. Style:  Channel Your Inner Obama

Everybody has their own style and in order to develop that style, watch as many people as you can give presentations and speeches.  What are they doing well? Using pace, pause, pitch, volume?

Observe what they’re doing that works and, equally importantly, what doesn’t.  Steal from the best and leave the rest.  As you practice and video yourself, you’ll begin to discover and develop your own style.

No two speakers are the same so don’t worry about being like someone else.  Remember, it’s about being the best YOU, not becoming someone else.

Great sources are Youtube, TEDtalks, and people at your own company or place of work.

 

 

4. Memory:  Build Your Palace! It Helps Reduce Presentation Nerves

Presentation nerves are often brought on by that fear of forgetting. Mnemonics is the learning of techniques to aid in human memory.  A mnemonic device could be an acronym or image that helps you to associate information and recall it more efficiently.

 The Roman orators often used the image of a palace or great house with many rooms where they attributed sections of their speeches to different rooms in order to remember the information better.  

 

5. Delivery:  Bring It On, Superman

After you do your warm up (and everybody does something), the last thing you do is stand with your feet wide apart and hands on hips a la Superman/Wonder Woman and smile (master of all your survey)

It will help banish those presentation nerves and give you a sense of expansion, positivity, and being grounded.  

Then, picture your audience and send out a thought of generosity, ‘I love you guys!’ and make it all about them, not you.  

So take it from the guys who started it all and use the five canons and take heed of Cicero;

‘Whatever you do, do it with all your might.’

 

It’s all there for the taking so practice, practice, practice and give it your best shot.  The worst thing that can happen is you try and fail, so try and fail again, and then try again.

 

 As Samuel Beckett said;

‘Ever tried. Ever failed.  No matter. Try again. Fail again. Fail better.’

 

“ConfidentSpeak is a Voice and Communications consultancy based in Dublin, Ireland. We have worked with leading Irish and international companies and executives. Contact us for details on our range of  corporate/private programmes for executives, sales teams and technical professionals.”

info@confidentspeak.com

www.confidentspeak.com

☎ +35319696056

 

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